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The Libertarian Christian Podcast

Join the LCI Team each week they explore, debate, and analyze the issues that are directly relevant to the intersection of Christianity and liberty. Always thoughtful, frequently controversial, and never boring (trust us), it is our hope and prayer that The Libertarian Christian Podcast serve as a valuable resource to the Church for years to come. Episodes are released every Monday. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher to get each episode as soon as it launches!
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Now displaying: Category: christianity
Mar 26, 2018

Regardless of your denomination, many American Christians have the sense that something is wrong in the Church today. Have we forgotten our mission and values, and if so, what can we do about it? Joining us to discuss these questions is entertainment industry professional and Christian media expert Jonathan Bock, co-author of the new book, The Way Back.

Mar 19, 2018

Human flourishing depends on individuals who have an entrepreneurial spirit. In the past several decades, world poverty has plummeted in part due to capitalism and entrepreneurial endeavors. Chris Horst of HOPE International joins us today to talk about the importance of entrepreneurship for human flourishing.

Mar 12, 2018

The gun control debate in the United States has raged on for decades, and in many ways has escalated in recent years. Every time there is a mass shooting, calls for more gun control as the “obvious solution” engulf social media and public policy discussions. Furthermore, faulty statistics and bad arguments tend to run rampant in any discussion. In this episode, legal scholar Trevor Burrus of the Cato Institute joins us to unravel some myths surrounding the gun control debate.

Mar 5, 2018

Join us for our second episode where we answer questions you have submitted, as well as popular topics from our Facebook group. We talk about cannabis, whether libertarianism can become an idol, why it's difficult to get people to see taxation as aggression, who our favorite theologians are, and much more!

Feb 26, 2018

Concern for social justice has become one of the most effective ways for Christians to signal that they care about the world's poor, yet below the surface of this virtue signaling are some important issues about justice itself – of social well-being – and understanding how to be a Christian concerned with the common good. It is important to understand just how the message of the gospel applies to the well-being of the world. Jason Jewell joins us to talk about why a libertarian view of the state, society, and human action are critical concepts to understand before one arrives at a viable pursuit of social justice.

Feb 19, 2018

What distinguishes Christian libertarianism from secular (or other) forms of libertarianism? Is it mostly a question of motivation, or are there also differences in policy application? Do Christian libertarians sometimes even disagree with one another on policy? In this round table discussion, we explore these and other questions pertaining to what may be considered unique about a Christian perspective on libertarianism.

Feb 12, 2018

LCI recommends a lot of books for libertarians. Many of our regular readers or listeners may already be familiar with some of the most influential books amongst libertarian Christians, but in this episode, we're going to discuss some other, perhaps lesser-known books (as well as some of the obvious ones), and explain what relevance they have for understanding political and economic theory in light of Christianity.

Books covered in this episode:

  • Called to Freedom, ed. Elise Daniels and Jacqueline Isaacs
  • For a New Liberty by Murray Rothbard
  • Libertarian Theology of Freedom by Edmund Opitz
  • Religion and Capitalism: Allies not Enemies by Edmund Opitz
  • Bible and Government by John Cobin
  • Anarchy and Christianity by Jacque Ellul
  • Healing Our World by Mary Ruwart
  • Democracy, the God that Failed by Hans Herman Hoppe
  • The Quest for Community by Robert Nisbet
  • The Powers Trilogy by Walter Wink
Feb 5, 2018

It's not the Old Testament that a Christian often goes to for their theological defense of non-violence. Our guest, Matthew Curtis Fleischer, believes that the Old Testament not only sets the stage for a non-violent Jesus, but also believes Christians will find in its pages the foundations for an ethic of non-violence. A lawyer and a libertarian, Fleischer's approach will feel familiar to a libertarian audience as he explores the Scriptures with attention to important clues as to what God was doing with his people.

Jan 29, 2018

You don't have to become a radical Christian to begin changing the world. Our guest, psychologist Richard Beck, has written Stranger God to deal directly with what a Christian is to do when they know they should reach out to strangers – those on the margins. In an effort to get away from mere academic discussions of hospitality and overcoming our personal barriers, Beck sought out ministry opportunities that put him directly in the presence of those on the margins.

In this episode, Beck discusses how important it is to take personal responsibility for one's own actions regarding others and how understanding the main principle of comedy improv helped him say yes to strangers in his midst. He even talks with LCI about how we can relate to those who are our “political enemies” (ideologically speaking).

Jan 22, 2018

Constitutions are a divisive topic even amongst libertarians, with the debate often centered on the anarchism v. minarchism issue. But as stateless projects like the Seasteading Institute and others gain more traction, even anarchists and voluntaryists are asking: is there a place for “constitutions” in a fully privatized society?

Joining us to discuss is political commentator and author Trey Goff, who recently wrote a model constitution intended for a privatized, stateless society. We cover some of the various strengths and weaknesses of the concept, how it may be improved or altered, and what role it may have in the developing landscape of stateless society projects.

Jan 15, 2018

About a year and a half in the making, the Libertarian Christian Institute is now blessed to present our inaugural volume of Christian Libertarian Review: our new scholarly journal dedicated to the intersection of Christianity and libertarian thought. On this episode, General Editor Jamin Hübner and Assistant Editor Ruth Ryder join us to discuss the mission and vision of the journal, what readers can expect to find in Volume 1, and some plans for the journal's future.

Jan 8, 2018

Most people, including most libertarians, have a very negative perception of lobbyists, often because lobbyists seem to represent those who loot the rest of us on behalf of special interests. While this is often the case, there are also some lobbyists who represent liberty. How does someone go about lobbying for more freedom in a formal political capacity, and what does it look like as a career? In this episode, libertarian Christian lobbyist Aaron Day joins us to discuss his take, as well as other potential career paths for those who want to work full-time in the liberty movement. 

Jan 1, 2018

One year ago, it was widely acknowledged and discussed that for good or bad, 2016 had been truly extraordinary. As we now reflect on 2017, what are we to make of it?

In this episode, LCI contributor and Mimetic Theory expert David Gornoski returns to give a Girardian take on some of the top stories from 2017. Mixing theology, philosophy, sociology and anthropology, David helps us to interpret the past year and prepare for what may await in 2018.

Dec 25, 2017

As we celebrate the Advent, economist and friend of LCI Bob Murphy returns to the show to tell us about his Christian testimony. Once a staunch atheist who planned to write (in his words) “the definitive refutation of Christianity,” Bob was converted to Christ in the early 2000’s and has become a leading voice in the libertarian Christian movement. How did he come to know the Lord? Unwrap this episode to find out.

Dec 18, 2017

Doug and Norman talk about the birth stories of Christ and how Matthew and Luke both use language and employ storytelling techniques that provide a clear anti-Roman and anti-empire story. This is good news for all because the message of liberation is not only about our personal liberation from the captivity of sin, but the cosmic liberation of captivity from slavery and oppression.

Dec 11, 2017

Parabolic interpretation has been seen through many lenses throughout Christian history. While the deepest theological meaning of the parables carry the greatest importance, there are also important lessons which can be gleaned from the historical context in which the parables occur.

In this episode, Jeffrey Tucker returns to discuss principles of economics in the parables of Jesus. By stepping into first century Israel and looking at the parables as stories which, on their surfaces, resonated with the life and times of Second Temple Jews, we can see that Jesus assumes a world of just property rights, freedom of contract, and economic liberty.

Nov 20, 2017

It seems that people are no longer able to have a decent conversation with each other about politics or other controversial topics. Social media exacerbates our tribal tendencies and often we get entrenched in our own beliefs. It often takes the wisdom of one who has had years of experience talking to and discussing hot-button topics. There's no better person for to talk to about this than EconTalk host, Russ Roberts.

Russ Roberts joins us for this episode to discuss what it takes to maintain a civil discussion during the holiday season (or any season!). With insight and wisdom from Adam Smith to his experience as host of EconTalk and a professor, Russ shares with us some very important things about life, both in the personal sphere and the social sphere.

 
 
Nov 13, 2017

No matter where we are in the world, Silicon Valley plays a big role in most of our lives. Much of the technology that we have come to rely on for daily use is either designed in, managed from, or otherwise largely affected by the engineers, developers, programmers and executives who live in the Bay Area. Over the years --- and especially within the last two or three --- Silicon Valley has been increasingly in the spotlight for its politics, particularly how the political agendas of its influencers and executives affect the rest of us.

In this episode, we are joined by Silicon Valley insider and LCI advisory board member Aaron Ginn. Aaron helps us sort fact from fiction in how we think about the politics of Silicon Valley, and to understand what it all means for freedom of speech and other key principles of liberty. We also discuss futurism in a Christian context, and how we should look at technology as a tool given to us by God in order to love our neighbors and advance the Lord's kingdom.

Nov 6, 2017

The popular perception of libertarianism is often skewed. While those on the left tend to think of libertarians as greedy and self-absorbed with no concern for the poor, those on the right --- and particularly the Christian right --- often conflate libertarianism with libertinism. What's worse, many libertarians have contributed to this error by mixing libertarianism with other elements of their ethics, giving the inaccurate impression that libertarians must be hedonists, abuse narcotics, or live licentiously, or that at the very least they must not object to someone else's questionable behavior.

As we continue our interview series with the authors of Called to Freedom, Taylor Barkley joins us to talk about the differences between libertarianism and libertinism. What are the different shades of libertarianism? How do the distinctions between 'thin libertarianism' and 'thick libertarianism' come into play? Why do some libertarians mix libertinism into their libertarianism? How should we explain libertarianism to those on both the left and the right?

Oct 30, 2017

What is the biblical portrayal of the state? The Libertarian Christian Institute frequently discusses this question; it has bery important ramifications for how we think about political philosophy. In this episode, we continue our interview series with the authors of Called to Freedom as we are joined by Jason Hughey, author of the chapter on the Bible and government.

Jason walks us through the narrative portrayal of the state in the Bible and helps us to see that state officials are sinful people just like the rest of us. As such, they should not be viewed as a special class with some intrinsic ability or right to rule, nor are they exempted from the ethical constraints that bind everyone else. In contrast to political power, the power of Christ is found in the gospel. We also cover some helpful guidelines for thinking about political power and the Bible, some pragmatic considerations, and of course, we get Jason's take on Romans 13.

Oct 23, 2017

Mass shootings, gun control
Protest with a football
North Korea, South Korea, Rajoy as Franco

No, it’s not a new Billy Joel song; it’s a discussion of some very important current events in culture, domestic and foreign policy, and international news which have happened during the last couple of months. 2017 has seen a lot of extraordinary developments --- some good, some bad, and some downright evil --- and in this episode we discuss a few which have been prominent in recent news cycles. We start off with the Las Vegas shooting and the left calling for gun control, move into football in American culture and the anthem protest controversy, spend some time going over the escalating North Korean conflict and the Iranian nuclear deal, and close out discussing the Catalonian secession vote and what is currently transpiring in Spain.

Oct 16, 2017

The Diocese of South Carolina, once part of the Episcopal Church, seceded from the denomination in 2012 after a complex dispute, and in 2017 joined another Anglican denomination, the Anglican Church in North America. However, the Episcopal Church claims ownership of the diocese's real estate, as well as certain trademarks and intellectual property rights pertaining to its name and branding. What has ensued is an intricate and multi-faceted legal dispute between the diocese and the Episcopal Church. This story illustrates important considerations for handling ecclesiastic disputes and church splits, and what can happen when the state gets involved. Joining us to discuss his take is the Rev. Canon Jim Lewis from the Diocese of South Carolina.

Oct 9, 2017

The War on Drugs is one of the most frequently-cited policy issues in modern politics, and it also serves as a clear foil of libertarianism. Whether or not one supports inflicting legislative violence to stop non-violent activity, as happens routinely in the Drug War, is perhaps the most important litmus test of a libertarian. Where one stands on the Drug War also often serves as a firm dividing line between libertarianism and conservatism. Yet despite the relentless evil of the War on Drugs, which is even more destructive to society than drug abuse itself, bad arguments and weak ethics still prevail in most national policy discussions. Thankfully, the tide is turning in recent years.

In this episode, we are joined by Raeford Davis, a former police officer who used to enforce the Drug War, and now is one of its most fervent and piercing critics. Raeford walks us through his own story as a Christian police officer enforcing drug prohibition, what happened to change his mind, why the Drug War is both intrinsically evil and pragmatically ineffective, and why it is incumbent on every police officer, and every citizen, to consider and reject the sin that is the War on Drugs.

Oct 2, 2017

Sociology, psychology and anthropology can bring us many important insights into our theology, and 20th century scholar René Girard is a testament to that fact. Diving deep into the root causes of sin and social conflict, Girard helps us to see that much of human strife occurs because of our misshapen 'mimetic' desires to imitate our neighbors (including by destroying them to take what is theirs) and/or project condemnation for our own sins onto others (scapegoating).

We are joined on this episode by Girard expert David Gornoski, a friend and contributor to LCI. David explains the foundations and applications of Girard's insights and their relevance for both Christian theology and libertarian political philosophy. If you like this episode, terrific! If you don’t like this episode, consider that perhaps you’re scapegoating us and should reconsider.

Sep 25, 2017

The subject of theonomy (rule by the Old Testament law) and Christian Reconstructionism (rebuilding society with the Old Testament as a blueprint) is sometimes raised in discussions of Christian political theology, particularly from those in the Reformed tradition. Most Reformed Christians would not identify as theonomists, yet interestingly, many who do are also associated with the libertarian movement.

In this episode, we are joined by CJay Engel of The Reformed Libertarian, a longtime friend of LCI, to discuss the history and theology of the Christian Reconstructionist movement. CJay critiques the theonomic position from a Reformed perspective, and explains why the Old Testament law is not meant to be followed by modern nation-states and political bodies.

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