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The Libertarian Christian Podcast

Join LCI Founder/Chairman Norman Horn, Board members Doug Stuart and Jason Rink, and Executive Director Nick Gausling as each week they explore, debate, and analyze the issues that are directly relevant to the intersection of Christianity and liberty. Always thoughtful, frequently controversial, and never boring (trust us), it is our hope and prayer that The Libertarian Christian Podcast serve as a valuable resource to the Church for years to come.
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Now displaying: November, 2017
Nov 27, 2017

God created a world in which our work matters. Often we fall into the mindset of compartmentalizing our lives into sacred or secular categories, but in the Christian life, everything is sacred and eternally valuable (including our work). In this episode, we are joined by pastor, author and ministry leader Tom Nelson to discuss how we can and must bridge the gap between Sunday and Monday, connecting our Christianity with our 'secular' work lives. We also see how a right understanding of free markets fits within the Christian worldview and orients us to better promote human flourishing.

 

Nov 20, 2017

It seems that people are no longer able to have a decent conversation with each other about politics or other controversial topics. Social media exacerbates our tribal tendencies and often we get entrenched in our own beliefs. It often takes the wisdom of one who has had years of experience talking to and discussing hot-button topics. There's no better person for to talk to about this than EconTalk host, Russ Roberts.

Russ Roberts joins us for this episode to discuss what it takes to maintain a civil discussion during the holiday season (or any season!). With insight and wisdom from Adam Smith to his experience as host of EconTalk and a professor, Russ shares with us some very important things about life, both in the personal sphere and the social sphere.

 
 
Nov 13, 2017

No matter where we are in the world, Silicon Valley plays a big role in most of our lives. Much of the technology that we have come to rely on for daily use is either designed in, managed from, or otherwise largely affected by the engineers, developers, programmers and executives who live in the Bay Area. Over the years --- and especially within the last two or three --- Silicon Valley has been increasingly in the spotlight for its politics, particularly how the political agendas of its influencers and executives affect the rest of us.

In this episode, we are joined by Silicon Valley insider and LCI advisory board member Aaron Ginn. Aaron helps us sort fact from fiction in how we think about the politics of Silicon Valley, and to understand what it all means for freedom of speech and other key principles of liberty. We also discuss futurism in a Christian context, and how we should look at technology as a tool given to us by God in order to love our neighbors and advance the Lord's kingdom.

Nov 6, 2017

The popular perception of libertarianism is often skewed. While those on the left tend to think of libertarians as greedy and self-absorbed with no concern for the poor, those on the right --- and particularly the Christian right --- often conflate libertarianism with libertinism. What's worse, many libertarians have contributed to this error by mixing libertarianism with other elements of their ethics, giving the inaccurate impression that libertarians must be hedonists, abuse narcotics, or live licentiously, or that at the very least they must not object to someone else's questionable behavior.

As we continue our interview series with the authors of Called to Freedom, Taylor Barkley joins us to talk about the differences between libertarianism and libertinism. What are the different shades of libertarianism? How do the distinctions between 'thin libertarianism' and 'thick libertarianism' come into play? Why do some libertarians mix libertinism into their libertarianism? How should we explain libertarianism to those on both the left and the right?

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