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The Libertarian Christian Podcast

Join the LCI Team each week they explore, debate, and analyze the issues that are directly relevant to the intersection of Christianity and liberty. Always thoughtful, frequently controversial, and never boring (trust us), it is our hope and prayer that The Libertarian Christian Podcast serve as a valuable resource to the Church for years to come. Episodes are released every Monday. Be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher to get each episode as soon as it launches!
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Now displaying: May, 2017
May 29, 2017

On today's episode, we are joined by libertarian Christian economist Art Carden to tackle one of the most pressing and divisive issues in contemporary American politics: immigration. President Trump's stance on this issue was one of the key factors that propelled his victory in last November's election, but since then many of the hard-line promises he campaigned on have not come to fruition. This has caused some in his base to criticize him heavily, while others are thankful for this change (whatever the cause may be).

It's no secret that even libertarians are split on how to think about immigration, and particularly its relation to property rights. Carden walks us through the economics of immigration, but also engages us on the theological-philosophical and ethical dynamics at work in how we think about borders, property, labor, and community. You could build a wall to keep this discussion out of your thinking, but we'd encourage you to take a more 'cosmopolitan' approach by listening to the episode.

May 22, 2017

On this episode, the always insightful (and frequently controversial) biblical scholar Dr. Pete Enns joins the show to talk to us about the journey of faith, trusting God, how to disagree with other Christians, pitfalls in biblical interpretation, and much more. Those familiar with Enns' work typically have a strong opinion either for or against him. The listener is of course free to reach his or her own conclusions, though we will say that a number of us at the Libertarian Christian Institute --- even those who strongly differ from Enns on some points --- have greatly appreciated and benefited from his material over the years.

Sooner or later, we all go through uncertain times in the Christian life. Who among us hasn't felt scared, uncertain, or confused, and unable to voice our thoughts from fear of being made into a church pariah? One permeating theme of Enns' work is that biblical faith is about trusting in God and moving forward even during these times; another is that being faithful to the Scripture requires us to come to it on its own terms, not ours. And all of this has tremendous relevance for how we relate to other believers in a way that honors Christ and unifies the Church, rather than furthers division.

If you feel compelled to deconstruct this episode, please consider doing a grammatical-historical word study of the transcript first.

May 14, 2017

Several weeks ago, Pope Francis escalated his political and economic rhetoric with a direct attack on libertarianism. Jeffrey Tucker, one of the liberty movement's most influential thought leaders and himself a Roman Catholic, was told by his publisher that it seems as if the Pope's comments were aimed at his book A Beautiful Anarchy (recently released in Spanish to strong sales). Jeffrey delivered a written response to the Pope on the website of the Foundation for Economic Education, and today he joins us for an in-depth discussion.

Does Pope Francis have an accurate understanding of libertarianism? In Roman Catholic theology, are the Pope's comments on such subjects considered binding, or is he speaking outside of his competency? Does the Catholic Church have a history of supporting the western classical liberal / libertarian tradition? Is the libertarian emphasis on individual rights consistent with authentic community? Jeffrey answers all these questions and more, and shares his much-needed message to the Pope (and all Christians) for why if he wants to uplift communities and human dignity, he should support liberty and free markets.

Join us on this fascinating episode as we bring Roman Catholics and Protestants back together for the very first time since 1517!*

*(Unlike the history discussed in this episode, this comment is not at all factual).

May 8, 2017

In this episode of the Libertarian Christian Podcast, Norman, Doug and Nick venture into the metaphorical woods with a discussion of things we've been thinking about lately relevant to faith and freedom. We start off with aritificial intelligence and robotics, jump over to Russiaphobia and the New McCarthyism, round the corner with Rene Girard and Hank Hanegraaff, and close out with some practical application on prioritizing issues.

Several segments didn't make it into the final cut, including three white men talking about racial tensions in modern America (it wasn't any good; trust us). As for what did make the cut, here's your obligatory college campus trigger warning: “If you're a Marxist, neocon, socialist, crony capitalist, Democrat, Republican, independent, libertarian, male, female, or human being, you may find something here marginally offensive or disagreeable. The listener accepts all responsibility for any faux outrage that may result from their choice to listen. You may wish to consult a psychological professional for additional information if needed.”

May 1, 2017

It's obvious that throughout history, books have been one of the primary methods for communicating ideas. However, certain books stand out above the rest in terms of their perennial relevance and impact across hundreds or even thousands of years; these have come to be known as the Great Books. In this episode, humanities scholar Dr. Jason Jewell joins us to discuss the immense value of the Great Books for sharpening both our Christian faith and our libertarian political philosophy.

Covering the last 3,000 years of literature in about an hour would be a Herculean effort beyond the capabilities of we mere mortals, but we do our best to look at some important highlights throughout the ages and what they can teach us about the New Testament era, the development of political philosophy, the history of Christian and non-Christian thought, and the nature of the human spirit. Studying the Great Books is a lifelong journey, and we hope that this episode encourages listeners to be diligent readers and, most importantly, deepens their desire to study the greatest book, the Bible.

If you don't know how to read, you can probably skip this episode. But if you understood that last sentence, then don't miss this interview.

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